What is a Hurdy Gurdy ???

Stories memories and people

Moderators: Global Moderators, AnneM

SarahND
Site Admin
Posts: 5563
Joined: Thu Apr 27, 2006 12:47 am
Location: France

Post by SarahND » Thu Jan 24, 2008 4:39 pm

Russell wrote: The Hurdy-Gurdy was indeed a stringed musical instrument with melodic strings and sympathetic strings. It was played...
Russell :!: Please :!: :!: Why this past tense :?: My brother makes and plays hurdy gurdies as well as lutes and is still very much in the present :wink: :D
Regards,
Sarah

GTSCOT
Posts: 10
Joined: Sat May 14, 2005 9:49 pm
Location: USA

Re: What is a Hurdy Gurdy ???- Thanks for the responses

Post by GTSCOT » Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:10 pm

Thanks one and all for all the wonderfull answers. I thought this would be the best place to get definitive and colourful answers. Our small family discussion has been settled. I appreciate everyone taking the time to :D answer. All the best. :D :D
Brodie;Brown;Coll;Fanning;Gault;Kelly;Kirkpatrick; McGinnis;McGuire;McIntyre;Murphy;Sinclair;Smith;Sweeney;Ward - SW Scotland-Ayrshire;Dunbartinshire;Glasgow- Belfast;Donegal.

Russell
Posts: 2559
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2005 5:59 pm
Location: Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire
Contact:

Post by Russell » Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:21 pm

Hi Sarah

I used the past tense only in relation to the Scottish musical scene. There are some excellent luthiers in Scotland but, to the best of my knowledge, no-one still makes Hurdy-Gurdys.
I like the sound it makes and it gives a good accompaniment to the voice.
It is a bit like the Combolins the Corries used to use for Scottish music.

Russell
Working on: Oman, Brock, Miller/Millar, in Caithness.
Roan/Rowan, Hastings, Sharp, Lapraik in Ayr & Kirkcudbrightshire.
Johnston, Reside, Lyle all over the place !
McGilvray(spelt 26 different ways)
Watson, Morton, Anderson, Tawse, in Kilrenny

nelmit
Posts: 3972
Joined: Wed Dec 15, 2004 11:49 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by nelmit » Thu Jan 24, 2008 9:52 pm

Muriel wrote:Surely the iron hoop & stick is a gird (gurd) & cleek.

Muriel
I know it as a cleek and girdle. :D

Regards,
Annette

PaulaD
Posts: 216
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 5:42 pm
Location: Born in Edinburgh, now living in Essex1

Post by PaulaD » Thu Jan 24, 2008 10:12 pm

Russell wrote:
It is a bit like the Combolins the Corries used to use for Scottish music.

Russell
Oh Russell, you've brought back some very happy memories. I loved the Corries and saw them in the Caley in Edinburgh several times and also at the Albert Hall in London where they refused to sing Flower o Scotland in case it upset the English members of the audience :shock: :wink:

Paula
Searching for Barclay Aberdeenshire, Stewart Edinburgh, Brown Edinburgh & Uphall, Finlayson E Lothian, Fairley & Renton E & W Lothian for starters!

davran
Posts: 97
Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2006 11:32 pm
Location: Monkton, Kent, England

Post by davran » Fri Jan 25, 2008 5:19 pm

Up until a year or so ago, there was a chap who played the Hurdy Gurdy in Canterbury (Kent) just outside the cathedral entrance. He was a great tourist attraction, but has now retired.
Researching: KNOX of Renfrew. Also FORSYTH, MCFARLANE, MCINDOE, BENNIE, HUTCHISON, HENDERSON

tishgibbons
Posts: 298
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2005 10:47 pm
Location: Galway, Ireland

Post by tishgibbons » Sun Jan 27, 2008 9:50 pm

Here in Ireland a hurdy gurdy was one of the rides at a funfair - as children we used to refer to the fair as the hurdy gurdies or the swingin' boats!!

Tish
Researching Mitchell Grassick Bowman Farquharson Wilson Allanach Leys Coutts Gauld McNerney from Crathie and Braemar, Strathdon and Glenbuchat and who moved on to Aberdeen, Glasgow, Ireland, Australia, India, Canada.

dizzybint
Posts: 55
Joined: Fri Oct 15, 2010 11:59 am

Re: What is a Hurdy Gurdy ???

Post by dizzybint » Fri Oct 15, 2010 2:00 pm

isnt a hurdy gurdy an organ with a handle on the side and monkey on top..

Hibee
Posts: 216
Joined: Tue May 25, 2010 3:24 pm

Re: What is a Hurdy Gurdy ???

Post by Hibee » Fri Oct 15, 2010 3:29 pm

I remember them when they were the Corrie Folk Trio (have vague recollection of a fourth person). You used to get subjected to the "folk scene" of a Sunday, as they played in licenced hotels, and these were the only places open for a drink in Scotland, on the Sabbath.

Hibee
www.adams-of-adamsrow.com
Adam(s): Newton, Midlothian
Brock: Orkney/Leith
Bridges: Leith
Sweeney: Ireland/Leith
Brown: Edinburgh/Hamilton

Russell
Posts: 2559
Joined: Sat Dec 24, 2005 5:59 pm
Location: Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire
Contact:

Re: What is a Hurdy Gurdy ???

Post by Russell » Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:07 pm

Hi Hibee

They were the Corrie Folk Four and Paddy Bell when they sang in the newly formed Paisley folk song club. My that rolls back a lot of years :shock: :D :D :D

Hurdy gurdies were a cross between an autoharp and a barrel organ :D

and Tish we used to call the big boats "Sweezie boats" across in the Lothians. You had to pull ropes to get them swinging. Cheap way of entertaining the kids. Take their pocket money then ask them to do the work :lol: :lol:

Russell
Working on: Oman, Brock, Miller/Millar, in Caithness.
Roan/Rowan, Hastings, Sharp, Lapraik in Ayr & Kirkcudbrightshire.
Johnston, Reside, Lyle all over the place !
McGilvray(spelt 26 different ways)
Watson, Morton, Anderson, Tawse, in Kilrenny

Post Reply