Exotic Food ***birthday bumped post***

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Hibee
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Exotic Food ***birthday bumped post***

Post by Hibee » Thu Jan 13, 2011 10:49 am

I remember, it must have been 1958, give or take a year, the arrival of Mackintosh Red apples in our local Edinburgh fruiterers.

We had never seen apples so red or so shiny, and we had to have them, although they were 4 times the price of the homegrown product. I think they were imported from Canada.

Does anyone else have memories of the arrival of new foodstuffs?

Hibee
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Currie
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by Currie » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:54 am

Hello Hibee,

Everyone else has probably forgotten all about their last apple and is just thinking about their next one.

I’m afraid I can’t add anything interesting to your thread, but I’ll put in a plug for Australian Apples. Australia was sending her best to Scotland in 1958.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=EQ ... ples&hl=en

All the best,
Alan

momat
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by momat » Mon Jan 17, 2011 3:02 am

Mackintosh Red apples
They did come from Canada and when I left school I worked for the local Grocers and we used to polish all the apples and pears using the tissue they came wrapped in before we put them on display.This made them really shiny.
Maureen

momat
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by momat » Mon Jan 17, 2011 3:19 am

The McIntosh Red (or McIntosh, colloquially "the Mac") is an apple cultivar with red and green skin, a tart flavor, and tender white flesh. It becomes ripe in late September. It is traditionally the most popular cultivar in Eastern Canada and New England, well known for the pink sauce unpeeled McIntoshes make. It is the superior[peacock term] eating apple and well suited for applesauce, cider, and pies. It is extremely common to find this particular cultivar packed in children's lunches across North America owing to its small to medium size and longstanding reputation as a healthy snack.
And then there were New Zealand Apples .Both Red and Golden Delicious.
Personally I don't think apples taste as nice as the ones we ate as children.
Maureen

Hibee
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by Hibee » Mon Jan 17, 2011 11:04 am

About the same time, I also remember the first arrival of pomegranates. These were bought for novelty value, rather than taste. I think more bits got thrown about, than eaten.

Hibee
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joette
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by joette » Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:02 pm

Oh Hibee you have made me cry with talk of pomegranates.Remember when food came in seasons-Spring was heralded by Ayshire potatoes-usually accompanied by syboes/spring onions & a "dod" of butter.Summer was lettuces,tomatoes & strawberries.Autumn was monkey nuts,berries from the bushes,Halloween & pomegranates.
My Dad after eating his evening meal would say "What now my love,what manner of cakes,biscuits,pomegranates & all manner of great delacies do you have for my delictation tonight"?
These words would be spoken night after night.My Mum would usually have some home -made delicacy to tittilate the palate.
One night after his usual request my Mum with great giggles from all the children presented to my Dad a very rare & expensive treat -a pomegranate! He was stunned into silence.We were all allowed a taste & ever since these have been one of my favourite fruits.
I have eaten them freshly picked in Egypt where they use the skin soaked in water as a hair rinse & blusher for the cheek,
Now you can buy them almost year around but I liked when food came in seasons to mark the passing of the year.
When dates came into the shops you knew that Christmas was on the way & those lovely little tangerines fragrancing the air with their scent.
Oh & I remember when crisps went from the little blue twist of salt in the packet to ready salted & then exotics of exotics-flavoured crisps-the first flavours I remember were salt& vinegar & cheese & onion.When pickled onion came on the market-my school lunch money was spent many a day on sweets & a packet of pickled onion crisps from "Jenny's" at the Crescent just up from Dalmuir Primary.
Pomegranates can never be eaten without remembering my daddy's words & after his untimely death every time they came into the house we would laugh in rememberance of the stunned look on his face when he asked for his usual"...pomegranates &all manners of great delicacies".
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Russell
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by Russell » Mon Jan 17, 2011 5:25 pm

Hibee. You brought back memories of summers spent with my grandparents in Leven. They took in boarders every year for the Glasgow Fair and one couple took me as company for their six year old daughter. They took us down into the town and there in the fruiterers was a display of melon slices. I had never seen one before so we all had a slice. their daughter took one bite and turned up her nose. Joy of joys - I ended up with TWO slices (well , one and a bit !) Bliss is too mild a word. I still love it and, like Joette, I prefer the anticipation of seasonal fruit.

Russell
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speleobat2
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by speleobat2 » Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:50 pm

Hi all,

Speaking of apples, I can remember when Granny Smith apples first appeared here in the USA. It was so strange to be eating a green apple! And so good!

Also kiwi fruit were very exotic when they first appeared. People were looking at this little brown furry fruit and wondering what to do with it!

Carol :D
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LesleyB
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Re: Exotic Food

Post by LesleyB » Sat Dec 06, 2014 4:50 pm

This post has been birthday bumped!!

[birthday]
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StewL
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Re: Exotic Food ***birthday bumped post***

Post by StewL » Sun Dec 07, 2014 10:24 am

The story about pomegranates reminded me of when I was working in a special care hostel for young folk. Lo and behold, out the back between two units was a pomegranate bush, only a couple of us knew what it was so we kept quiet :-
What a shame they shut it down and redeveloped the site. :(
Stewie

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