Stovies ***birthday bumped post***

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Susie Q
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Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:13 pm
Location: Doncaster, South Yorkshire

Stovies ***birthday bumped post***

Post by Susie Q » Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:46 pm

Hi folks,
Has anyone got a recipe for stovies ? I remember eating them when I was a bairn. I'd like to try my hand at making stovies, see if it's as good as I remember !

Cath
Surname Interests
SANAGHAN, N. Ireland, Lanarkshire, Fife
FLEMING, Bathgate, Fife
ARMOUR, MAILLIE, Ayrshire, West Calder
GIBBONS, Ireland, Lasswade, Fife

pinkshoes
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Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:28 pm
Location: Yorkshire

Post by pinkshoes » Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:22 pm

I'm sure I have one in a recipe book, but can't vouch for it. I'll try and dig it out for you. I used to love Stovie Tams as my mother called them. She wasn't the world's best cook, bless her (I turned vegetarian cos I didn't think I liked meat till I left home :oops: ) but she was good at stovies, soup and chips made with Golden Wonder potatoes :lol: :lol:

I'll let you know if I find it.

Best wishes
Pinkshoes

paddyscar
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Location: Ontario, Canada

Post by paddyscar » Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:23 pm

From "The Highlander's Cookbook: recipes from Scotland" by Sheila MacNiven Cameron. (1966)

"Stovies" ... easy to prepare, don't require strict measuring are adaptable and don't need constant supervision while they're cooking.
6 large potatoes
2 medium onions
1/3 cup butter/margarine/bacon fat/chicken fat
salt and pepper
water or stock

Peel and thinly slice potatoes and onions. Arrange in layers in a heavy pan, dotting each layer with butter or fat and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Add just enough water/stock to keep potatoes from burning (perhaps 1 cup for this many potatoes). Cover tightly and simmer very gently until the potatoes are quite soft. Serves 4.

Chicken Stovies

1 Frying chicken, cut up
4 large potatoes
2 large onions
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1/3 cup butter
1 cup water or chicken stock.

Peel and slice potatoes and onions into 1/4 inch slices. Arrange alternate layers of chicken, potatoes and onions in a heavy frying pan. Dot each layer with butter and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Add the water. Cover tightly, bring to a boil and simmer very gently for about an hour. Serves 4.

Frances
John Kelly (b 22 Sep 1897) eldest child of John Kelly & Christina Lipsett Kelly of Glasgow

pinkshoes
Posts: 461
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:28 pm
Location: Yorkshire

Post by pinkshoes » Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:26 pm

Here's one from a google search in case you're too starving to wait for me to find the book :

http://www.rampantscotland.com/recipes/ ... tovies.htm

Mum made hers with mince (she made everything with mince except the soup) but I used to buy them at lunchtime from the local baker in Falkirk and I'm sure they used corned beef :? Never seen chicken stovies though Frances. But I guess they were intended to use up whatever was left over.

Would you mind trying all the recipes please Cath and let us know which was best :lol: :lol:

Best wishes
Pinkshoes

Susie Q
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2006 11:13 pm
Location: Doncaster, South Yorkshire

Post by Susie Q » Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:52 pm

Well, ahm fair slaverin' reading these recipes, can't wait to try them, will let you know if I'm successful.

Cath
Surname Interests
SANAGHAN, N. Ireland, Lanarkshire, Fife
FLEMING, Bathgate, Fife
ARMOUR, MAILLIE, Ayrshire, West Calder
GIBBONS, Ireland, Lasswade, Fife

mallog
Posts: 438
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 5:41 am
Location: Ayrshire Coast

Post by mallog » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:13 pm

paddyscar wrote:From "The Highlander's Cookbook: recipes from Scotland" by Sheila MacNiven Cameron. (1966)

"Stovies" ... easy to prepare, don't require strict measuring are adaptable and don't need constant supervision while they're cooking.
6 large potatoes
2 medium onions
1/3 cup butter/margarine/bacon fat/chicken fat
salt and pepper
water or stock

Peel and thinly slice potatoes and onions. Arrange in layers in a heavy pan, dotting each layer with butter or fat and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Add just enough water/stock to keep potatoes from burning (perhaps 1 cup for this many potatoes). Cover tightly and simmer very gently until the potatoes are quite soft. Serves 4.

[
My recipe would be something like the above one but instead of the fat add a layer of slice sausage on the top and the fat from that is enough. I know some folk use mince but I've never tasted it or the chicken one. I sometimes add carrot to it but it's really up to your own taste
Anderson, McAlpine, Blue - Argyll
Dunn Fife /ML
Coutts, McGregor - Perth/Govan
Glen, Crow, Imrie - Angus
Scott & Pick ML
Mason - Co Down

paddyscar
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Location: Ontario, Canada

Post by paddyscar » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:29 pm

I can't vouch for the recipes as they are straight from the cookbook.

I never knew there was a "name" for potatoes cooked this way, but I always loved them! A nameless treat done on occassion with mince.

Frances
John Kelly (b 22 Sep 1897) eldest child of John Kelly & Christina Lipsett Kelly of Glasgow

LesleyB
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Location: Scotland

Post by LesleyB » Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:35 pm

Hi all
This is the way it was done when I was growing up:
Meat fat (I think it was usually from Roast beef, made the day before) was melted in a pan, then a couple of sliced onions were fried until coloured. Add potatoes, cut in thick slices or chunks and add water - to cover about 2/3 the potatoes. (they should not be covered with water completely) add salt. Cover tightly, and leave on a low heat to cook, about 20-25 mins I think. You can roughly mash them or leave them as they are. There was often gravy to go with them (again, left over from the day before).

I adapted this method later, after I left home & stopped eating meat. You can make pretty good veggie stovies using the above method but use half butter and half oil to fry the onions, and when adding the water, add about a small teaspoon of marmite. Yummy, ...honest! Stovies were one of the things I found hardest to do without when I stopped eating meat. :D

Best wishes
Lesley
Last edited by LesleyB on Tue Nov 28, 2006 12:12 am, edited 1 time in total.

Bertha
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Joined: Tue May 24, 2005 6:35 pm
Location: Edinburgh

stovies

Post by Bertha » Mon Nov 27, 2006 11:57 pm

Ah Stovies!
Long time since I've made them but I'm drooling at the thought (diet has prevented such delicasies).
I've made them for upwards of 60 people sometimes. My recipe is much the same as those mentioned. We all have our favourite additions to the potatoes & onions, mine is cornbeef, my husbands is sausage (link or sliced). I remember my mother making them with a bit of mutton, very tastie. Stovies made with gravy, I've never had, my mum called them "Leith Stovies" as this was the way my dad's mum made them I'm told and she was frae Leith.
Think I'll make them later on in the week, never mind the special diet.
Well goodnight all off to dream about it.
Bertha
looking for
Nelson/Neilson,Wood,McDonald,Baillie - East Lothian
McLaren,Ross,Kelly,McEwan,Nicholson,Price/Pryce,Telfer,Robertson, Dickson/Dixon, Gibson,Niven Edinburgh

ninatoo
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Joined: Sat Oct 15, 2005 10:42 am
Location: Australia

Post by ninatoo » Tue Nov 28, 2006 11:47 am

My mum still makes stovies here in Australia and my kids love it. We make ours with link sausages, potato,carrot and onion.

Nina
Researching: Easton ( Renfrewshire, Dunbarton and Glasgow), Corr (Londonderry and Glasgow), Carson (Co. Down, Irvine, Ayrshire and Glasgow), Logan (Londonderry and Glasgow)

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