Sayings

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Andrew C.
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Sayings

Post by Andrew C. » Fri Jan 05, 2007 2:33 pm

My mother came out with a saying I had never heard her say before over the New Year which was:

"she looks like Mrs. Munch looking for Saltcoates" Has anyone else got any favourite sayings their parents or grandparents, used and what are the origins of these obscure sayings? Another one my mother uses is: "It's all over to one side like Gourock?" (I think it's Gourock)

Muriel
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Post by Muriel » Fri Jan 05, 2007 3:17 pm

I've never heard the one about Mrs Munch but "all to one side like Gourock" was a favourite of my mother's. She also used - of an uneven hemline - "all heughs and howes"; at least I think that's probably how it should be spelled, although I heard it as "heechs and hows"!. Another one, said of children overhearing things that adults said was "buggerlugs" :shock: - still in used among some of my American cousins. I'm sure there are lots more.

Muriel
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rita
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Post by rita » Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:06 pm

A couple of my mums' was
She luks lik ANNAKAS MIDDEN
Anyone know what Annakas midden was?
Another was if we were asking too many demands was "Be lik Askwith wait and see".
Rita

joette
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Post by joette » Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:10 pm

"Spinning like a peerie on a dyke" was a fav. of my Granny's when she thought she was overburdened with housework and/or a short time to do it in.
"Buggerlugs" was always used as a term of affection for a mischevious child even amongst those who would never think of letting a swear word pass their lips.
" Ooch a man running for his life wouldn't notice"-something noticiably out of place/defective but all is not lost!
"Maybe's aye, maybe's no but keep going & it's a skelp on the lug"(Grandpa!)
"It's like Rosie's home in here"-if a place was busy and/or untidy& also "You'll end up in Rosie's home-which I think may have been a "Model".
A fav saying to the dog when she is being annoying "You'll end up in Milton with your electric earings on"(Milton is a Cat & Dog Home where strays are put down.)Very tongue in cheek!
Researching:SCOTT,Taylor,Young,VEITCH LINLEY,MIDLOTHIAN
WADDELL,ROSS,TORRANCE,GOVAN/DALMUIR/Clackmanannshire
CARR/LEITCH-Scotland,Ireland(County Donegal)
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ALSO BROWN,MCKIMMIE,MCDOWALL,FRASER.
Greer/Grier,Jenkins/Jankins

Andrew C.
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Post by Andrew C. » Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:11 pm

Wheesht is obviously pretty common however the longer version "Haud yer wheesht" is not used as much, what exactly is yer wheesht and how do you haud it?

Jean Jeanie
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Post by Jean Jeanie » Fri Jan 05, 2007 5:53 pm

Andrew

My mother in law's longer version of this was "hud yer wheesht till a get a pail"

So what is your "wheesht?" How do you "hud it" Then when you've "hud it"how do you get in into the pail?

Best wishes
Jean

JimM
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Post by JimM » Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:02 pm

rita wrote:A couple of my mums' was
She luks lik ANNAKAS MIDDEN
Anyone know what Annakas midden was?
Another was if we were asking too many demands was "Be lik Askwith wait and see".
Rita
I've heard this too... wonder if originated in Glasgow? :?
I have a poor relief application from 1900 where the daughter is working in "Annackers' sausage works" in Anderston...could this be the origin?
I imagine a sausage factory midden would be quite disgusting. :shock:

Jim
researching
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paddyscar
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Post by paddyscar » Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:04 pm

rita wrote:A couple of my mums' was
She luks lik ANNAKAS MIDDEN
Anyone know what Annakas midden was?
Another was if we were asking too many demands was "Be lik Askwith wait and see".
Rita
Might refer to British PM Asquith's lack of action. "Be like Asquith - wait and see"

Annaka's midden, rather than Mrs. Smith's/Mrs. Brown's/Mrs. Black's midden.

Frances
John Kelly (b 22 Sep 1897) eldest child of John Kelly & Christina Lipsett Kelly of Glasgow

Lizzie
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Post by Lizzie » Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:17 pm

I could write a book on the sayings my mother and her sister used to come out with. I remember a most used was, speaking of someone else's small child was It's "awfy bozzie", what ever that was! (lost with spelling)

Lizzie.

jegss
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Post by jegss » Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:29 pm

My wee granny used to say ' Every scittery coo likes a neighbour'. Refering , i think, to gossipmongers.
Another one was ' ye widne turn yer toe where yer heel should lie for god's sake if the devil wis dead'. Meaning a person was too selfish to help anyone out.

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