Sayings

Stories memories and people

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JimM
Posts: 304
Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 4:11 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by JimM » Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:30 pm

paddyscar wrote: Annaka's midden, rather than Mrs. Smith's/Mrs. Brown's/Mrs. Black's midden.

Frances
If you wanted to say something was messy or untidy...you would have said " it's like a midden"
But if you wanted to add emphasis to the mess you would have said "it's like Annackers midden"
Everybody would have known what a midden was like... But Annackers was this mythical, even more disgusting midden.

I don't go with the "Mrs Smiths midden" theory :-k .... middens were more communal (you didn't have your own midden)
Middens were basically a pile of ...Err thingy ....... I don't imagine anyone would want to put their name to one :lol:

Jim
researching
McIntyre, Menzies, Cowley, Pearson, Copland, McCammond, Forbes, Edgar etc. in Scotland
Skinner in Northumberland

pinkshoes
Posts: 461
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 6:28 pm
Location: Yorkshire

Post by pinkshoes » Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:33 pm

I've never heard of Annacker's Midden, but saying it with a slightly different emphasis gets you to A Nacker's Midden - could it be something to do with a knacker's yard - I do hope I'm not being rude with that one, but I truly don't know what a knacker's yard is - think it might be the abatoir?

Jist a thoct really

Big Rid Face
Pinkshoes

AnneM
Global Moderator
Posts: 1587
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 6:51 pm
Location: Aberdeenshire

Post by AnneM » Fri Jan 05, 2007 6:58 pm

Hi

Definitely heard the all over to one side like Gourock one. In fact sometimes use it myself to the mystification of children and husband alike.

Someone with a long fringe was often referred to as like 'a coo looking ower a dyke."

When we were little my mother's favourite threat was that "The Black Douglas will get you." Once I'd read about the Battle of Otterburn I was not sure why that was a threat as I reckoned he was a bit of a hero.

I've also lost count of the number of times I was told that if in any doubt I could spier as I had " a guid Scot's tongue in my heid."

You could also frequently be told to "Awa and bile yer heid and mak sheep's heid broth" or to " save yer breath to cool yer porridge."

An over-indulged and over-protected boy was often referred to as "his mammy's big tumshy".

I'm sure that the Asquith reference is correct as I believe that wait and see was one of his sayings.

Anne
Anne
Researching M(a)cKenzie, McCammond, McLachlan, Kerr, Assur, Renton, Redpath, Ferguson, Shedden, Also Oswald, Le/assels/Lascelles, Bonning just for starters

Davie
Posts: 607
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 4:36 pm
Location: Glasgow

Post by Davie » Fri Jan 05, 2007 7:04 pm

Huv loads o' East-end sayin's, but wid be oan ma saicont yellow kerd if a' postit' thaem oan here.
An yeese aw know ah widnae waaant tae offend oanywan.
Annaker's midden, if memory serves.
No sure if it had wan n or two, but it wiz a cheap butcher shoap at the Barras
Davie

JimM
Posts: 304
Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 4:11 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by JimM » Fri Jan 05, 2007 7:47 pm

Davie wrote:Annaker's midden, if memory serves.
No sure if it had wan n or two, but it wiz a cheap butcher shoap at the Barras
Davie
Hi Davie
I'm sure that midden has only wan n...
:lol:

Jim
researching
McIntyre, Menzies, Cowley, Pearson, Copland, McCammond, Forbes, Edgar etc. in Scotland
Skinner in Northumberland

Davie
Posts: 607
Joined: Fri Aug 12, 2005 4:36 pm
Location: Glasgow

Post by Davie » Fri Jan 05, 2007 8:19 pm

Guid wan Jim,
Gled somewan's peyin attention.
Ah jis wish ah "kid" get wan o' yoose tae pey ma bills.
Ah kin never quite get "could" put intae Weegiespeak.
Wid appreciate yer thoughts
And as I am in North Lanarkshire today, the proper spelling is midding.
Davie

JimM
Posts: 304
Joined: Fri Jan 14, 2005 4:11 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by JimM » Fri Jan 05, 2007 8:55 pm

Hi Davie

"could" is a tricky wan

I'd go with "kid".... as long as the emphasis is on the k (if the emphasis is on the d.. then it's a wean)

I grew up in Easterhoose where you would'nae even think aboot saying midden

More like .... "Where ur ye goin' shuggy?"

"Doon tae Corpach ......Ah've fun a lucky midjy"


Jim
researching
McIntyre, Menzies, Cowley, Pearson, Copland, McCammond, Forbes, Edgar etc. in Scotland
Skinner in Northumberland

StewL
Posts: 1396
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 12:59 am
Location: Perth Western Australia

Post by StewL » Sat Jan 06, 2007 3:01 am

Buggerlugs is more than familiar ta me.

Ma young brother has called me that since I cant remember :lol: :lol:

As for the others I have heard most of them from ma mither at one time or another including haud yer wheesht or I'll skelp yer lugs or was it somewhere lower doon :lol: :lol:
Stewie

Searching for: Anderson, Balks, Barton, Courtney, Davidson, Downie, Dunlop, Edward, Flucker, Galloway, Graham, Guthrie, Higgins, Laurie, Mathieson, McLean, McLuckie, Miln, Nielson, Payne, Phillips, Porterfield, Stewart, Watson

Anne H
Global Moderator
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2005 5:12 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by Anne H » Sat Jan 06, 2007 3:36 am

Something lower doon, Stewie :lol:

Regards,
Anne H

paddyscar
Site Admin
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2005 7:56 pm
Location: Ontario, Canada

Post by paddyscar » Sat Jan 06, 2007 6:12 am

pinkshoes wrote:I've never heard of Annacker's Midden, but saying it with a slightly different emphasis gets you to A Nacker's Midden - could it be something to do with a knacker's yard - I do hope I'm not being rude with that one, but I truly don't know what a knacker's yard is - think it might be the abatoir?

Jist a thoct really

Big Rid Face
Pinkshoes
One definition of a 'knacker' is a person who buys old horses to slaughter for pet meat, and possibly other useful byproducts.

Frances
John Kelly (b 22 Sep 1897) eldest child of John Kelly & Christina Lipsett Kelly of Glasgow

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